Short Moral Stories

On this page you can find a nice collection of short moral stories that teach us wisdom and give us better understanding of ourselves and people around us.

“We all need to be needed” story...

Lonely tree was growing among hot sands of dead desert. Prickly sands covered the Wood. The Sun mercilessly burned its bark. But the Tree kept on living in spite of all.
One day a Hawk flew over the desert. The Hawk saw the Tree and sat on its branch. He looked around the desert and said:
— You are a strange Tree, why do you keep on living among these dead hot sands? Who needs it?
— You, — the Tree answered.
— Me? — the Hawk was surprised. — I don‘t need you.
— But if not me, — the Tree told, — you would have to sit on the hot sand instead of my branches. If not me, someone, seeing you sitting on the tree alone, would say that nobody needs you, too and would ask you what you live for. Sitting on my branches you, Hawk, think that I need you. The Hawk thought about it and had to agree with the Tree. If there was no Tree, the hawk would feel himself alone and useless among this vast desert.

Short story about a teacher...

A new pupil, who has been already kicked out of three schools, was brought to the school.

One teacher came to class, looked at the new pupil and thought: “Where only such people come from…”

The second teacher came, saw a new pupil and said with anger:

— There is no lack of you here…

The third teacher came to class.

— Do we have a new pupil? – He rejoiced.

He went to a new pupil, shook his hand, looked into his eyes, smiled and said:

— Good morning! I was waiting for you!

 

The war and the old plough...

The war was going on. Men were fighting. Women were carrying food to soldiers day and night, nursing the injured. In the village only old people and children remained.
One old man took an old plough and started sharpening it, mending it while singing something. His wife said to him with annoyance:
– You have a stone heart! Your sons joined a deadly battle, the village is in mourning. Your comrades are thinking about the fate of the village, and you, knowing this, are mending the plough and singing a song! If someone would ask, whom are you trying for, what would you say? Tomorrow the enemy will come here, they will kill you and us too, and they will take your plough.
– Woman, what are you talking? They will kill us, but not the plough. I’m building – not destroying. The world is resting on this plough: if we survive, we will need the plough, and if we die, maybe the love for labour will awaken in those who will take it. Maybe even I will be blessed. We don’t know, what is what in this world.

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